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Manoj Doss not exist

@ManojDoss

Sep 20

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Immediate-onset but not delayed-onset PTSD associated with hallucinogen use: onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jt… Assuming this effect is reliable, if it were simply self-medication, one has to wonder why those that develop PTSD later are not also using hallucinogens. 1/4

Delayed-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is defined as a period of 6 months or more between trauma exposure and episode onset. Due to the limited research and lack of epidemiological...

onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jt…

Comparing immediate‐ and delayed‐onset posttraumatic stress disorder: Results from the National...

Delayed-onset posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is defined as a period of 6 months or more between trauma exposure and episode onset. Due to the limited research and lack of epidemiological...

One possibility is that using hallucinogens while a traumatic event is still fresh and one is still sensitive to this trauma could increase the likelihood of developing PTSD. Many psychedelic users do tend to avoid using psychedelics soon after something traumatic happened. 2/4

Another possibility is that recent hallucinogen use could make one more sensitive and if trauma occurs within this "plasticity" window they could be more prone to developing PTSD. Easier said than done, but it'd suggest avoiding something bad happening shortly after tripping. 3/4

I realize this is a correlational survey, but unlike psychedelic-focused surveys with obvious confirmation bias, it wasn't directed to hippies wanting say something good about psychedelics (or puritanical prohibitionists wanting to say something bad about psychedelics). 4/4

Manoj Doss not exist

@ManojDoss

Cognitive Neuropsychopharmacologist @JHPsychedelics: Drugs of (ab)use esp. psychedelics and other hallucinogens, episodic memory, skeptical 'til proven guilty

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