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Michael Gilman

@michael_gilman

Sep 22

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Corporate venture is really a very different beast from financial investors and each corporate VC group is itself sui generis. As an entrepreneur, it's important to understand their deliverable - it's not always financial, as this interesting interview makes clear.

STAT

@statnews

Sep 22View on Twitter

In a Q&A, the head of Bayer's venture arm talks about the field's renewed interest in neuroscience and the influence the team exerts on young biotech companies from board seats. buff.ly/3SpR7OM

In a Q&A, the head of Bayer's venture arm talks about the field's renewed interest in neuroscience and the influence the team exerts on young biotech companies from board seats.

buff.ly/3SpR7OM

Bayer’s venture arm ramps up, seeking to invest $1.3 billion

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One useful question to ask to understand a corp VC's deliverable is where they report in the parent organization. If it's to the CFO, it's usually financial return. If it's to BD, it's deals. If it's R&D, it's to explore areas the R&D org is unwilling to spend its own $$$ on.

There are exceptions, of course. And blends. But I've found this to be a pretty reliable guide.

As to non-corp VCs, their sole job is to make money for their LPs. You don't have to like that, but it's not hard to understand. And the sooner you internalize this principle, the more rational and predictable their behavior becomes. Which is good for your sanity.

Michael Gilman

@michael_gilman

Scientist, entrepreneur, ex-biopharm exec, former FM radio jock, lifelong hockey fan, aspiring guitar player, #immigrant. CEO @ArrakisTx. Other stuff.

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